Round Cushion Ta-daaa!

Yarn: Jarol Heritage DK in four shades (Teal = shade 131, Kingfisher = shade 136, Green = shade 137 and Red = shade 102). This is a wool/acrylic/nylon mix and is lovely to work with. It’s a little bit catchy on your hook but works up very well and is quite soft for a woolly yarn. It comes in nice 100g balls as well. I got mine from Top Wools/Twisted Stitches in Barnsley.

Sorry for unsharp photos, I tried to catch the light when I got home yesterday but it was rubbish.

I made both sides the same and then joined it by holding it wrong sides together and slip stitching the back loops only together. I went as far round as I could without the cushion in, because it’s a lot harder to join with the cushion inside. Then I squished the cushion a bit to stuff it in and then fluffed it out again, before finishing joining. I’m really rather pleased with it! I only started it on Saturday afternoon and I finished it at er, 11pm on Sunday night sitting in bed very tiredly but determinedly thinking ” I WILL finish this today! I WILL finish this today!”

What I will do next time is use a smaller hook to make the overall result denser. I don’t like how you can see the cushion through the stitches really, these photos don’t show it but you can see it in real life. I also think that my joining is messy. I didn’t start each round in the same place each time as I was trying to avoid getting on obvious line but it means that I’ve got lots of obvious lumpy messy bits where I’ve joined each round. Next time I’m going to investigate Sarah London’s technique of doing a seamless join. When I saw this ages ago I thought it was really faffy looking and that a visible line surely wouldn’t bother me that much. I was wrong! The messy bits DO bother me a lot more than I thought so next time I will get out my trusty darning needle for some seamless joining action. Wish me luck.

So would you like to know what it was that I was doing wrong?

Yep … I was working in between the stitches instead of out of the stitches! I had been working off of Lucy’s pattern and was so absolutely sure that I should be working between the stitches. I was telling Lucy about my sparkling revelation while following Siobhan’s instructions that I should be working out of the stitches, all proud like, and Lucy goes … “erm, you are meant to be working out of the stitches in my pattern!” “Noooo!” I said, “In your pattern, the photos show it working out of between the stitches!” I was 100% sure of this you see, having spent hours AND HOURS trying to get a bloody circle to LIE FLAT DAMMIT.

But upon double checking the pattern with fresh eyes I discovered that in fact I was wrong.

I really hate being wrong you know. It’s pretty low down on my list of things to be. It comes below things like “being the one who always washes up” and “being cold” and “being smelly.”

But never mind, because I HAVE A ROUND CUSHION! Who’s going to join me in saying “Hurrah for round cushions and flat circles!” ?

Now, so that you can all make some flat circles too, here is Siobhan’s comment in full:

Siobhan

Not sure if this will help or maybe you are doing this anyway. This is a circle using a formula, that you can use to make any size circle from. Sometimes you may need to adjust slightly but I have never had to. If your circle tightens inwards then you have too few increases for your circle. If it is floppy and curling outwards you have too many stitches.

Ch 6 and join in ring with ss.
Round 1: 3 ch (counts as a treble), 11 trebles into ring, ss in top of beginning chain (12 stitches)
Round 2: 3 ch (counts as a treble), 1 treble in ss – at the base of the 3 chains you have just made; (this counts as your first increase by crocheting 2 trebles in one stitch), 2 trebles in each treble of round 1, ss in top of beg ch (24 stitches)
Round 3: 3 ch (counts as a treble), 2 trebles in next treble, (1 treble in next treble, 2 trebles in next treble) 11 times, ss in top of beg ch (36 stitches).

To continue, increase in every 3rd stitch on round 4, every 4th stitch on round 5 and so on, increasing by 12 stitches on each round. If you want you can do the increases the opposite way around: example round 3 – instead of doing chain 3 (which counts as a treble) in first stitch and then your 2 trebles in the next stitch, you can do two trebles in the first stitch (your chain 3 will be the first of them) and then treble one in the next stitch and so on, still making sure you do 12 increases in the row. Both work fine. If your circle starts looking hexagonish it is recommended that you alternate the two, so one row you start with your increases and the next row you start with just one treble in each stitch and then do your increases of two trebles in one stitch. I have not had to do this. I made 2 nice berets with this formula, which comes from one of my books but is also in others or on-line. Some books just tell you to increase equally at intervals but don\’t tell you where, or how often – not helpful!

I have used English crochet terms.

If you start your circle smaller – say with 8 trebles into a 4 chain ring (including your ch 3 which counts as the first treble), then the principle remains the same; every row you increase by the amount of stitches you have. So in this example you would go from 8 trebles on round 1 to 16 on round 2 and 24 on round 3. The way you make your increases is the same in all cases.

Hope this is helpful, it really does work (for me anyway but it does depend on whether or not I\’ve explained it properly!)

Isn\’t it horrible having boring work to do instead of the things you want to be getting on with? Still they can\’t stop you thinking about those hexagons any time you want can they? Hope you sort out your circles!

21 thoughts on “Round Cushion Ta-daaa!

  1. Great you have made your circular cushion. You must be really pleased with it. I always know when a pattern goes wrong then it is probably
    me and I just have to leave it for a while and then go back and read it again! Usually takes me a while before I spot the error.
    I have mislaid the next colour I need for the colour sequence in the blanket I am making!! So nothing done this evening.
    Enjoy the rest of the week.xxx

  2. Well that is a fab job! Just a note about the seamless thing. I have been doing that on my bag but….. it causes there to be slightly bigger holes so you still notice it. You will have to give it a try and let me know cos really maybe I am doing something wrong. It is easy enough to do. You just need to be bothered to thread your needle at the end of every row. Give it a try and let me know what you think.

  3. Hurrah for your round cushion Ta-daah. Its lovely :-) xx
    So glad you got it sorted Heather, but I do have to say, you remind me slightly of me ;-P
    Hugs Fee xxx

  4. Oh dear, that’s exactly how I make my circles and I do work out of the stitches, so that is no help to me in making my circles flat. I think perhaps it may be a lack of consistency in my tension, because I end up with it wrinkling kind of, like the inside of it is larger than the edge. Very puzzling. Anyway, that’s fantastic that you finally worked yours out and were able to get your cushion finished! Yayness! Also, I don’t know what Sarah London’s method is, but you can check out this tutorial for a seamless color change. It’s a little finicky but it doesn’t require a needle.

  5. Oh dear, that\’s exactly how I make my circles and I do work out of the stitches, so that is no help to me in making my circles flat. I think perhaps it may be a lack of consistency in my tension, because I end up with it wrinkling kind of, like the inside of it is larger than the edge. Very puzzling. Anyway, that\’s fantastic that you finally worked yours out and were able to get your cushion finished! Yayness! Also, I don\’t know what Sarah London\’s method is, but you can check out <a href=\"http://minspiration.blogspot.com/2010/05/colour-change-tutorial.html\">this tutorial</a> for a seamless color change. It\’s a little finicky but it doesn\’t require a needle.

  6. Good work lady, loving those colours and who doesn’t love a crocheted cushion that springs up over a weekend?!

    I have to confess, sometimes I don’t know if I’m doing the right thing when it comes to working out of stitches, “Work out of the front of the stitch”, won’t lie, not entirely sure what that means.

  7. Good work lady, loving those colours and who doesn\’t love a crocheted cushion that springs up over a weekend?!

    I have to confess, sometimes I don’t know if I’m doing the right thing when it comes to working out of stitches, “Work out of the front of the stitch”? Won’t lie, not entirely sure what that means.

    As for the ripple? I have no idea. I swear I’m doing every single thing the pattern tells me to do, I must be chaining wrong at the beginning or something because I just do not have enough stitches when it comes to the end. Clearly I’m going to have to get my backside over to you so I can do it in front of you and you can show me where I’m obviously going wrong!

  8. Well done with your lovely cushion! – will be investigating some of that yarn. I have never made a cushion; I think it is one of those deceptively simple sounding things, yet when you come to do it there are quite a few complications (like how to get it to fit your cushion). Sarah London’s seamless join is brilliant when you are using different colours but if you are just using one, you will still have to cut the yarn at the end of every row and may not want to do that. I tried several other things for my single colour circles but I can no longer remember them or where I got them from (sorry). One improved the look of joins quite well and the other which involved making pretend stitches (sounds weird I know) instead of doing chain 3′s worked so well the join was almost invisible. There are lots of videos or tutorials from clever people solving problems I didn’t even know existed which I find from time to time. YouTube is great for this. Sometimes it does involve a bit of faffing though it’s usually worth it. Sarah London is your best bet when you have different colours though. Crochet is tricky because of the placement of stitches and sometimes it just isn’t obvious where to put them, I’ve done all sorts of weird and ‘wrong’ things. Like anything, it’s easy when you know how! I’m gradually finding that as I do more crochet, I find it easier to ‘read’ my stitches and know what is what but I still get confused.

  9. Well done with your lovely cushion! – will be investigating some of that yarn. I have never made a cushion; I think it is one of those deceptively simple sounding things, yet when you come to do it there are quite a few complications (like how to get it to fit your cushion). Sarah London\’s seamless join is brilliant when you are using different colours but if you are just using one, you will still have to cut the yarn at the end of every row and may not want to do that. I tried several other things for my single colour circles but I can no longer remember them or where I got them from (sorry). One improved the look of joins quite well and the other which involved making pretend stitches (sounds weird I know) instead of doing chain 3\’s worked so well the join was almost invisible. There are lots of videos or tutorials from clever people solving problems I didn\’t even know existed which I find from time to time. YouTube is great for this. Sometimes it does involve a bit of faffing though it\’s usually worth it. Sarah London is your best bet when you have different colours though. Crochet is tricky because of the placement of stitches and sometimes it just isn\’t obvious where to put them, I\’ve done all sorts of weird and \’wrong\’ things. Like anything, it\’s easy when you know how! I\’m gradually finding that as I do more crochet, I find it easier to \’read\’ my stitches and know what is what but I still get confused.

  10. Hi Heather I love your question. Just a quick question to clarify something for me…

    WHen you say ‘out of stitches’ do you mean under both the front and back loop at the top of the stitch and not between the posts / under all 3 horizontal bars at top?

    Hope question makes sense!

    Enjoy your colourful cushion!

    Fiona x

  11. It is a very lovely cushion. If you don’t like seeing the pad through the stitches why don’t you make a quick coloured cover for it – should be quite easy.
    As well as seamless join I like to do standing trebles (also called ‘crocheting in the air’, I think) for the first stitch in the round (rather than 3ch). It means your tail end is at the top of the stitch which can mean more weaving in, but for a round cushion you’d still be able to crochet over it on the next round. I think it’s so much neater I take the extra weaving.

    As for being wrong – well it happens to the best of us sometimes! x

  12. 100% percent inprovement Heather! It does make a difference working under the stitches instead of between the stitches. Yes please try the Sarah London’s tutorial on the invisible join. I have been using this method for several weeks now. Doesn’t it make you feel good when you accomplish something that has you puzzled!!! Good job Heather!

  13. On the We Love Lucy Ravelry group, click where it says, “All members please read the new Group Rules & Guidelines page!” and then in the box on the right headed “All group pages” click “Tutorials”. Look at “Kat’s Air Crochet” – once you try this you’ll never chain 3 at the beginning of a round again!

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